An argument in favor of schools keeping sports and its benefits

Part Two Socialist, Marxist and Communist Indoctrination School kids are being prepared for a socialist world government under the United Nationsto which most public school teachers would not object. The kids are being taught that one culture is just as good as another.

An argument in favor of schools keeping sports and its benefits

Stereotypes about indigenous peoples of North America Why do these people continue to make mockery of our culture? In almost every game of hockey, basketball, baseball, and football—whether high school, college, or professional leagues—I see some form of degrading activity being conducted by non-Indians of Indian culture!

We Indian people never looked the way these caricatures portray us. Nor have we ever made mockery of the white people. So then why do they do this to us? It is painful to see a mockery of our ways.

It is a deep pain. Over time, the campaign began to focus on Indian names and mascots in sports. It has been argued that harm to Native Americans occurs because the appropriation of Native culture by the majority society continues the systems of dominance and subordination that have been used to colonize, assimilate, and oppress indigenous groups.

Where other minorities would be consulted, decisions impacting Native Americans, such as building the Dakota Access Pipelineare made while excluding Native concerns. Steven Denson, director of diversity for Southern Methodist University and member of the Chickasaw nation, while not issuing a blanket endorsement, has nevertheless stated that there are acceptable ways to use Native American mascots if it is done in a respectful and tasteful manner.

And it must also be done with the support of the Native-American community. There is a way to achieve a partnership that works together to achieve mutually beneficial goals.

Stereotypical and historically inaccurate images of Indians in general interfere with learning about them by creating, supporting and maintaining oversimplified and inaccurate views of indigenous peoples and their cultures. When stereotypical representations are taken as factual information, they contribute to the development of cultural biases and prejudices, clearly a contradiction to the educational mission of the University.

In the same vein, we believe that continuation of the use of Indians as symbols and mascots is incongruous with the philosophy espoused by many Americans as promoting inclusivity and diversity.

It also impacts non-natives by reinforcing mainstream stereotypes, preventing learning about Native American culture. The APA states that stereotyping is disrespectful of the beliefs, traditions and values of Native Americans.

In particular, studies support the view that sports mascots and images are not trivial. Exposure to any stereotypes increased the likelihood of stereotypical thinking; demonstrating the harm done to society by stereotyping of any kind. Commission on Civil Rights released an advisory opinion calling for an end to the use of Native American images and team names by non-Native schools.

While recognizing the right to freedom of expression, the commission also recognizes those Native Americans and civil rights advocates that maintain these mascots, by promoting stereotypes, may violate anti-discrimination laws.

When found in educational institutions, mascots may also create a hostile environment inconsistent with learning to respect diverse cultures, but instead teach that stereotypes that misrepresent a minority group are permissible.

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Those schools that claim that their sports imagery stimulate interest in Native American culture have not listened to Native groups and civil rights leaders who point out that even purportedly positive stereotypes both present a false portrayal of the past and prevent understanding of contemporary Native people as fellow Americans.

Civil rights law in the United States reflect the difference between the experience of racism by African Americans and Native Americans. The effects of slavery continued after emancipation in the form of discrimination that insured a continued source of cheap labor.

What European Americans wanted from Native Americans was not labor but land, and many were willing to have native people themselves assimilate. Continued discrimination came to those who refused to do so, but asserted their separate identity and rights of sovereignty.

The appropriation of native cultures is therefore seen as discriminatory practice by some but is not understood as such by those that think of assimilation as a positive process.

The difference is reflected in the continued popularity of Native Americans as mascots when similar usage of the names and images of any other ethnic group, in particular African Americanswould be unthinkable, and the continued claim that the stereotype of the "noble savage" honors Native Americans.

This raised the difficulty of Native American identity in the United Statesalso an evolving controversy. By schools such as the University of Illinois "honoring" my ancestors? Continued use of the term encourages and perpetuates persecution, disrespect, and bigotry against Native men, women, and children".

There are many benefits associated with sports fandom, both private increased self-esteem and public community solidarity.

An argument in favor of schools keeping sports and its benefits

The activity of viewing sporting events provide shared experiences that reinforce personal and group identification with a team. The name, mascot, cheerleaders, and marching band performances reinforce and become associated with these shared experiences.

Many have made the argument that Native American mascots focus on bravery, courage and fighting skills rather than anything derogatory. Yet go to a game where there is a team with an Indian name and you will see fans with war paint on their faces.

Is this not the equivalent to black face? Chief Illiniwekthe former athletic symbol for the University of Illinoisbecame the subject of protest in The Chief keeps the memory of the people of a great Native American tribe alive for thousands of Illinoisans who otherwise would know little or nothing of them.

However, the tribal costume was not of the Illinois Confederationbut that of the Lakota tribe. One current exception is the Coachella Valley High School "Arabs" [80] which has also been the subject of controversy, resulting in the retirement of its more cartoonish representations.Yahoo Lifestyle is your source for style, beauty, and wellness, including health, inspiring stories, and the latest fashion trends.

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An argument in favor of schools keeping sports and its benefits

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Native American mascot controversy - Wikipedia